South St Louis City Restaurants - Dining - Food

South St Louis City Restaurants


restaurants in South St. LouisThere is no doubt that South St. Louis has a lot to offer to it's residents and visitors. South city is a vast region of multiple neighborhoods with many traditions.  Each South STL neighborhood has it's own characteristics and attributes and they are definently all worth exploring.  When it comes to dining options in South St. Louis, the selection of delicious restaurants is just as vast. Make certain to check one out on your next dining excursion.

St. Louis is home to 79 different neighborhoods, each with its own distinct architecture, culture, and style, thanks to varied origins and immigrants from around the world. Today, South St. Louis has dozens of popular neighborhoods, especially in areas that have recently seen community revitalization. Because there are active communities working to better the neighborhood in most areas, that makes the city a great place to live. However, a few neighborhoods are more popular than others, and while that does change from year to year, here are a few of the most popular.

South St. Louis Food and Restaurants


St. Louis Restaurants in South City  Phone  Attributes
 Cafe Plato  No Phone  Euro Coffee House
 The Copper Pig  314-499-7166  American
 Farmhaus  314-647-3800  American
 Feasting Fox  314-352-3500  German
 Gregory's Creative Cuisine  314-441-4481  Catering, Box Lunches
 Grbic Restaurant  314-772-3100  Bosnian, European Cuisine
 Guido's Pizzeria & Tapas  314-771-4900  Spanish, Italian, Pizza
 Iron Barley  314-351-4500  American, Smoked Meats
 Kenrick's  314-631-2440  BBQ, Catering
 Kounter Kulture  314-781-4344  Asian Fusion
 Lorusso's  31`4-647-6222  Italian
 Macklind Avenue Deli  314-481-2435  Deli
 Southtown Pub  314-832-9009  BBQ
 Taco Circus  314-320-8884  Mexican
 Trattoria Marcella  314-352-7706  Italian
 Quincy Street Bistro  314-353-1588  American

Popular Neighborhoods in South St. Louis

St. Louis Hills : St. Louis Hills is one of the newest of the popular neighborhoods in the city, as it only dates back to the 1930s and 1950s, when most of the area was constructed to allow people with jobs in the city to move out of the city. Now, it's bounded by Chippewa Street, Hampton Avenue, Gravois Avenue, and the city limits. With two parks, including the Forest Park, used for the 1904 World Fair Site, rich architecture, and a location that is both quiet and near to things to do, it's an excellent place to live by any standards. With picturesque homes and buildings, many of which have a French influence, the area is also beautiful, for sightseeing and for living in.

Southampton : With a varied historical background, Southampton stands out for its mostly German architecture including styles that range from Hansel and Gretel to Foursquare bungalows, and everything in between. e area is quiet, has one of the lowest crime rates in the city thanks to a large number of police officers living in the area, and has been constantly growing since the 1990s. With multiple parks, and easy access to almost all of St. Louis' major attractions, it's also centrally located with plenty of amenities and things to do. Most of the houses were built during the 1930s and 1950s, but some date back as early as 1905, making Southampton an excellent place to visit for the architecture.



Bevo : Bevo has a unique culture, combining mostly Germanic and Dutch architecture, with a primarily Bosnian population, leading to a mix of cultures, food, and styles. The area was built up in the mid-1800s by German and Dutch settlers, where it remained, until population began to decline in the 1990s, and Bosnians moved in. Today, the area is thriving, with a unique cultural and architectural appeal, and a central location that allows you to drive to many of St. Louis's attractions in just a few minutes. The area also has more than 20 grocery stores, four parks, and a relatively low cost of living. The entire area has been revitalized, and is now a popular neighborhood to move to, and has been steadily growing since the 1990s.

Carondelet : Founded in 1767 as its own town, Carondelet has a long history that predates much of the rest of the city. As a result, the neighborhood is home to some of the oldest homes in the city, of both French and German origin, while most of the housing was built between 1880 and 1930, making it a historic place to visit or live in. The industrial growth along the Mississippi River means that there are plenty of jobs in the area as well. The Patch is the neighborhoods most famous street, and is home to a wide array of architecture, much of which is older than that in the rest of Carondelet, and while considered part of Carondelet, is also considered as its own neighborhood.

Holly Hills: Holly Hills is nestled between Carondelet, Bevo Mill, Dutchtown, Boulevard Heights, and Carondelet Park. While the city varies between old homes and houses and new ones, it is graced with wide boulevards and streets, with large homes and bungalows, and a primarily middle class residence. While central to many St. Louis attractions, Holly Hills also has its own, with panoramic views of the Mississippi River over the bluffs in Bellerive Park. While relatively new, the area is beautiful, and offers a unique version of St. Louis living.

St. Louis is home to some of the most varied cultural and architectural neighborhoods in the world, and every neighborhood has its own culture, community, and style. Whether you're visiting them, or looking for a place to move, there's something for everyone. With architecture ranging from 19th century brick homes to modern high rise developments, and a great deal of Civil War era buildings, there's also a lot to see.